Ojos Electrónicos

jennifreorhelysvisage
Photo by Jennifer Orhélis

The photographs of Nluz are a good surprise.

We feel the desire to share with us his graphic, dramatic and ever humorous universe with a touch of delicacy.

The lines, the architecture but also the voids and women who tell a type of portrait and of a society which is looking for or which has been found, we don´t know.

But that´s what questions and makes you want to see more photos of Nluz.

It amazes me, I love, bravo the photographer!

Jennifer Orhélys, Artist, Paris, France. https://www.jennifer-orhelys.com

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Late-season wildfires are rampaging through Colorado.⁣ ⁣ Scenes of panic and destruction played out across Northern Colorado on Thursday as a wildfire exploded through the parched woods and valleys around Rocky Mountain National Park, offering a grim example of how climate change is making fire seasons longer and more destructive across the West.⁣ ⁣ “This is the worst of the worst of the worst,” said Sheriff Brett Schroetlin of Grand County, where the East Troublesome Fire had burned about 170,000 acres by Thursday evening.⁣ ⁣ Fire crews and residents were staggered by the wildfire’s speed and ferocity. It grew at a pace of 6,000 acres per hour, racing into Rocky Mountain National Park, forcing the park to close down, and jumping over the Continental Divide. By Thursday afternoon, the fire was menacing the resort town of Estes Park, on the eastern side of the national park, turning skies smoky yellow and forcing rounds of mandatory evacuations there.⁣ ⁣ Firefighters are also battling to contain the Cameron Peak Fire, north of Rocky Mountain National Park, which has burned since August and this week grew into the largest fire recorded in Colorado history.⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read more about the fires in Colorado and how, after a season of hellish wildfires throughout the West, there is new evidence that climate change and rampant growth are creating perfect breeding grounds for fire. Photo by Jessy Ellenberger, via @apnews

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Y esta es mi historia. Así, como fotógrafo adivino, fui soldado que luchó por la paz, siendo después un juez que habita un tribunal. La casa americana. Y todo gracias a una cámara fotográfica que intermedia entre los seres alienígenas, que imparten justicia y yo. O el mundo quizá. La luz es el canal de comunicación. Espero que sirva de ejemplo y la pandemia y el confinamiento os ayude a enriquecer vuestro conocimiento hacia un futuro mejor. Sí, se trata de evolución. Para mi ya es un presente. Que ustedes disfruten del Show. No tengan miedo….si están del lado luminoso de la fuerza.

Nluz Love

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The world’s largest tropical wetland has become an inferno.⁣ ⁣ This year, roughly a quarter of the vast Pantanal wetland in Brazil, one of the most biodiverse places on Earth, has burned in wildfires worsened by climate change. What happens to a rich and unique biome when so much is destroyed?⁣ ⁣ The wetland, which is larger than Greece and stretches over parts of Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia, also offers unseen gifts to a vast swath of South America by regulating the water cycle upon which life depends. Its countless swamps, lagoons and tributaries purify water and help prevent floods and droughts — they also store untold amounts of carbon, helping to stabilize the climate.⁣ ⁣ For centuries, ranchers have used fire to clear fields and new land. But this year, drought worsened by climate change turned the wetlands into a tinderbox and the fires raged out of control.⁣ ⁣ “The extent of fires is staggering,” said Douglas C. Morton, who leads the Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at @nasagoddard and studies fire and food production in South America. “When you wipe out a quarter of a biome, you create all kinds of unprecedented circumstances.”⁣ ⁣ His analysis showed that at least 22% of the Pantanal in Brazil has burned since January, with the worst fires, in August and September, blazing for 2 months straight.⁣ ⁣ Scientists are scrambling to determine an estimate of animals killed in the fires. While large mammals and birds have suffered casualties, many were able to run or fly away. It appears that reptiles, amphibians and small mammals have fared the worst. In places like California, small animals often take refuge underground during wildfires. But in the Pantanal, scientists say, fires burn underground too, fueled by dried-out wetland vegetation.⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read more. Photos by @mariamagdarre.⁣

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This urban safari comes with a warning: Watch out for snakes.⁣ ⁣ On nighttime hikes in Hong Kong’s surprisingly lush forests, a snake catcher teaches hikers about the reptiles — and their bites. William Sargent (1st photo) runs Hong Kong Snakes Safari, an outfit that takes residents on night hikes through the territory’s wooded hinterlands. The hikes highlight the scale of biodiversity in Hong Kong, a financial hub of 7.5 million people that is better known for its high-rises than its sprawling protected areas. It’s also a way for city slickers with snake phobias to confront their fears in the wild.⁣ ⁣ Hong Kong is nearly the size of Los Angeles, but about 40% of its land area consists of parks that were created in the 1970s when the Chinese territory was still a British colony. Human-animal conflicts are inevitable because so much of the protected land lies within walking distance of dense urban areas.⁣ ⁣ Snakes generally keep a low profile in Hong Kong, but because 8 native species are capable of inflicting fatal bites, the health risks can be serious if they end up in close quarters with humans. Sargent said the best way to avoid a snakebite is to watch your feet and walk with a high-quality headlamp.⁣ ⁣ In Hong Kong, no one has been killed by a venomous snake since at least 2005, according to a spokesman for the city’s Hospital Authority. In 2018, the last year for which data is available, the authorities recorded just 73 snakebites, making the chances of being bitten about one in 100,000.⁣ ⁣ “It’s not mystical,” Sargent said during the night hike. “It’s very clear-cut what the risk is. But there’s such a huge gap of misconception.”⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read more from the urban safari. Photos by @lamyikfei.

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New York’s East Village is the home of punks and poets. It is home to Beats, hippies and no wave bands, to Allen Ginsberg, W.H. Auden, Abbie Hoffman, graffiti artists and, in recent years, to tourists and droves of NYU students. In the latest installment in our series of walks around town, our critic @michael_kimmelman talks with the writer and artist Luc Sante about the Tompkins Square Park riots, CBGB and why he never went back to his favorite St. Marks Bar & Grill. “I once described it in a letter to a friend,” @luxante said. “A third of the crowd was singing, a third was sleeping, and a third was fighting. Then the Rolling Stones staged a music video there, and it was curtains for the bar. It became a place I never entered again.” Sante is the author of “Low Life,” which chronicles the seamy underside of bygone New York. He lived and worked for years in the East Village, although, as a matter of principle, he still calls it the Lower East Side. He writes about his experiences in a new collection, “Maybe the People Would Be the Times.” “What was different back then is that we were a self-selected set of young people,” he said. “We wanted to make things, and we grew tough hides. If your landlord decided not to pay the fuel bill, that was a passing hardship, but we were not living there to enjoy middle-class comforts.” Tap the link in our bio to read more from their conversation, including how living there, said Sante, “was like camping out amid the ruins of multiple pasts.” Photos by @zackdezon

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#PWRUP YOUR NAME

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This Medusa statue from a decade ago has become #MeToo art. Luciano Garbati’s sculpture — “Medusa With the Head of Perseus,” an inversion of the centuries-old myth — was reimagined as a symbol of triumph for victims of sexual assault, when it was unveiled in Lower Manhattan, just across the street from the criminal courthouse on Centre Street. Garbati was inspired by a 16th-century bronze: Benvenuto Cellini’s “Perseus With the Head of Medusa.” In that work, a nude Perseus holds up Medusa’s head by her snaky mane. Garbati conceived of a sculpture that could reverse that story, imagining it from Medusa’s perspective and revealing the woman behind the monster. In his application to the city’s Art in the Parks program, he noted that Medusa had been raped by Poseidon in the Temple of Athena, according to the myth. As punishment, Athena turned her wrath on Medusa, transforming her hair into snakes. The application stated that the story had “communicated to women for millennia that if they are raped, it is their fault.” At Tuesday’s unveiling in the park, Garbati talked about the thousands of women who had written to him about the sculpture. Many saw the image as cathartic, he said. But for some, the sculpture did not quite meet the moment. As news about the sculpture’s planned installation spread, activists and observers on social media wondered why a piece of art meant to honor the #MeToo movement — which was animated, in large part, by an outpouring of personal stories from women — was created by a man. One backer said men need to be a part of the conversation. Tap the link in our bio for more on how others weighed in. Photo by @jeenahmoon

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The number of new coronavirus cases in the U.S. is climbing toward a third peak, surging once again after growth slowed in late summer. While the geography of the pandemic is now shifting to the Midwest and to more rural areas of the country, cases are trending upward in most states, many of which are setting weekly records for new cases. The map above offers a snapshot of 2 earlier peaks of the pandemic — and where case counts stand today. Taken alone, case counts are an imperfect measure of the pandemic’s severity, and it is difficult to compare the current numbers with earlier points in the U.S. outbreak when testing was less widespread. But other critical measures are showing a resurgence, too. And the continuing spread of cases to new areas of the country suggests the outbreak is far from over. The rise since mid-September has been especially profound in the Midwest and Mountain West, where hospitals are filling up and rural areas are seeing staggering outbreaks. The regions are home to almost all of the metro areas with the country’s worst outbreaks right now. “We are starting from a much higher plateau than we were before the summer wave,” said Caitlin Rivers, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University. “It concerns me that we might see even more cases during the next peak than we did during the summer.” Tap the link in our bio for more analysis of the climbing numbers.

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A cross-border fight over water has erupted in Mexico. “This is a war to survive, to continue working, to feed my family,” said Victor Velderrain, a Mexican farmer who helped lead the takeover of a local dam that supplied water to the U.S. The Mexican government has been sending water to Texas, leaving growers like Velderrain next to nothing for their thirsty crops. So farmers seized the La Boquilla Dam (above) near Delicias, Chihuahua, one of the border region’s most important bodies of water. They have refused to allow any of the water to flow to the U.S. for more than a month. This has been one of the driest years in the past 3 decades for Chihuahua, the Mexican border state responsible for sending the bulk of the water that Mexico owes the U.S. The standoff is the culmination of longstanding tensions over water between the 2 countries that have recently exploded into violence, pitting Mexican farmers against their own president and the global superpower next door. Negotiating the exchange of water has long been strained. But rising temperatures and long droughts have made the shared rivers along the border more valuable than ever. The dam’s takeover is a stark example of how far people are willing to go to defend livelihoods threatened by climate change — and of the kind of conflict that may become more common with increasingly extreme weather. Tap the link in our bio to read more about the standoff at La Boquilla Dam and how climate change is exacerbating tensions along the U.S. border with Mexico. Photo by @danielberehulak.

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ANGUS AND BRIAN ON POWER UP #PWRUP

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#PWRUP THE WORLD  🇪🇨

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A group of tenants evicted their landlord. For years, residents of 5 buildings in Minneapolis had been involved in a prolonged battle against their landlord, Stephen Frenz, and his business partner, Spiros Zorbalas. They had mobilized for better conditions, resisted evictions, participated in a rent strike and held a vigil outside their landlord’s church. The tenants pushed the city council to revoke Frenz’s rental license. It eventually did, stripping his ability to collect rent. But Frenz still owned the apartments where the tenants lived. And he wanted everybody out so he could renovate and sell the buildings to the highest bidder. The tenants had another idea: They wanted him to sell to them. They prevailed and bought the 5 buildings. In their first major act of collective ownership, they celebrated by removing their landlord’s signs. “There was a time when we were just neighbors, not really talking to each other,” said Chloé Jackson, one of the residents who helped organize the effort. “Now, we’re a family.” A new kind of housing movement has been growing across America. In city after city, renters have begun to see themselves as a class, with shared interests and problems, and to organize together against evictions, profit-centered development and landlord disinvestment. Tap the link in our bio to read more about how tenants are reimagining the model of affordable housing, particularly during the pandemic. Photo by @littlebrownmushroom

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“I feel like I have dementia,” said Lisa Mizelle, a nurse practitioner and Covid-19 survivor. It’s becoming known as Covid brain fog: troubling cognitive symptoms that can include memory loss, confusion, difficulty focusing and dizziness. Increasingly, Covid survivors say brain fog is impairing their ability to work and function normally. Scientists aren’t sure what causes brain fog, which varies widely and affects even people who became only mildly physically ill from Covid-19 and had no previous medical conditions. Leading theories suggest it arises when the body’s immune response to the virus doesn’t shut down or from inflammation in blood vessels leading to the brain. Research on long-lasting brain fog is just beginning. A French report in August on 120 patients who had been hospitalized found that 34% had memory loss and 27% had concentration problems months later. In a soon-to-be-published survey of 3,930 members of Survivor Corps, a group of people who have connected to discuss life after Covid, over half reported difficulty concentrating or focusing. Dona Kim Murphey, a neurologist and neuroscientist, who herself has experienced post-Covid neurological issues, said research is crucial so symptoms are taken seriously. “People say in a disparaging way ‘It’s all in their head,’” she said. “In this case it is literally in our heads, and it is very real.” Tap the link in our bio to read more about the impact of coronavirus on cognitive function. Photo of Erica Taylor by @lnweatherspoon. Photo of Michael Reagan by @hiroko.masuike. Photo of Lisa Mizelle by @wesfrazer.

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THIS ONE’S FOR MAL. #PWRUP

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Independent Midwestern voters who turned to Donald Trump in 2016 now prefer Joe Biden, according to new surveys from The New York Times and Siena College. Donald Trump’s surprise victory in 2016 centered on the Midwest — particularly the ambivalent voters there who chose him at the last minute. But many soured on the president’s leadership early in his term. Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee, holds a significant lead in the pivotal states of Michigan and Wisconsin, with Trump so far failing to retain the overwhelming advantage he enjoyed among white voters there in 2016, according to the surveys. The new results, along with recent Times/Siena surveys from elsewhere in the Northern battlegrounds, suggest that the president has not yet managed to reassemble his winning coalition across the region. He faces modest but significant defections among white and independent voters, while facing a groundswell of opposition from those who voted for a minor-party candidate or didn’t vote at all in 2016. Trump’s support now runs slightly stronger among members of the Republican Party than it does among all voters who cast a ballot for him in the last election. Across recent surveys of Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Iowa and Ohio, Trump has retained the support of only 87% of those who voted for him in 2016. And Biden is holding on to considerably more of Hillary Clinton’s supporters. Tap the link in our bio for live election updates. @emilyiriselconin took this photo of Biden in Toledo, Ohio, on Monday.

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From the Light planet

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President Trump addressed hundreds of supporters gathered at the White House on Saturday in his first public event since he was hospitalized with the coronavirus. He is trying to recover forward movement in his campaign for re-election with just 3 weeks to go.⁣ ⁣ Trump called the event a “peaceful protest” in honor of “law and order,” and White House aides described it as an official event. But it had some of the hallmarks of his campaign gatherings, including attendees wearing red caps with his campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again.” ⁣ ⁣ “I’m feeling great!” Trump told the crowd at the event, which was organized by his supporter Candace Owens, who has led a “Blexit” movement to prompt Black voters to leave the Democratic Party.⁣ ⁣ Trump’s voice sounded stronger than it had earlier in the week, and his complexion was better than in a video of himself he tweeted out on Wednesday. But in a departure from his typical speaking engagements, Trump appeared for a shorter time than the nearly 30 minutes that officials advertised: He spoke for just about 15 minutes.⁣ ⁣ The event continues Trump’s pattern of using the White House for political events, as he did with his speech to the Republican National Convention in August. He plans to hold a rally in Orlando, Florida, on Monday.⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio for the latest. Photo by @nytmills.⁣

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Rober <nluzlove1@gmail.com>20:41 (hace 1 minuto)
para mí

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@johnlennon #LENNON80

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12 TRACKS. NOVEMBER 13. Link in bio. #PWRUP

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P1130988.RW2

En casa de Tracy England

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Meet Nadeen Ashraf, the 22-year-old force behind Egypt’s growing #MeToo movement. @actuallynadeen, a philosophy major, had been studying for an exam when she noticed that a certain Facebook post was missing. A fellow student at the American University in Cairo had posted a warning about a sexual predator — a manipulative young man from a rich family said to be harassing and blackmailing women on campus. And the post had been deleted without explanation. Enraged, she set aside her textbooks and created the Instagram page, @assaultpolice, that identified the man, Ahmed Bassam Zaki, and a list of accusations of misdeeds against women. “This guy had been getting away with stuff since the 10th grade,” she said. “Every time a woman opened her mouth, someone taped it shut. I wanted to stop that.” When she awoke the next morning, she found hundreds of notifications from people who applauded her post, and about 30 messages from women who confided that they, too, had been assaulted by Zaki. Some said they had been raped. Within a week, Zaki was arrested, the @assaultpolice account had amassed 70,000 followers and the page had prompted an outpouring of testimonies from other Egyptian women fed up with being humiliated and violated. Sexual assault is endemic in Egypt — a U.N. study in 2013 found that 99% of women had experienced harassment or violence — but reporting it is notoriously difficult. Police officials are reluctant to register assault cases. Powerful institutions prefer to sweep accusations under the carpet. Even the families of victims, wary of scandal or feeling a misplaced sense of shame, tend to hush it up. But Ashraf’s bold page offered a new way to move forward. Read more at the link in our bio. Photo by @sima_diab.

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Covid-19 has upended this year’s Chuseok harvest festival, South Korea’s Thanksgiving-like holiday.⁣ ⁣ This year, the government has asked South Koreans to stay home during Chuseok, which runs through the weekend, to avoid exacerbating the country’s latest coronavirus outbreak. Millions have canceled family gatherings, and their acquiescence comes with an emotional price: A normally joyful time of year now feels empty of its sacred rituals, and clouded with feelings of anxiety and disorientation. ⁣ ⁣ “Watching my parents grow older and change often worries me, but seeing them in person puts my mind at ease again,” said Joo Jae-wook, 57, a retired salesman and the oldest of four brothers, one of whom still lives close to home. “But this year I can’t even do that.”⁣ ⁣ The holiday has deep links to South Korea’s agricultural past and its custom of ancestor worship. Most families returning to their hometowns — usually that of the husband or father, though the tradition is evolving — visit graveyards and tidy their ancestors’ tombs. They also set out fruit on picnic mats as ritual offerings, exchange presents and gather to make songpyeon, a special rice cake that symbolizes familial bonds.⁣ ⁣ Chuseok falls on the nearest full moon to the fall equinox, known as a harvest moon. It is also celebrated in North Korea, albeit without the holiday travel rush that precedes the version in the South.⁣ ⁣ During a normal Chuseok, South Korea’s roads and public transit system strain to accommodate all the people who are rushing back from cities to their hometowns. But this year, trains are leaving stations half empty because of social distancing restrictions. Passengers are buying seats at the last minute with relative ease.⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read more from South Korea. Photo by @junmichaelpark of people in traditional Korean formal attire outside the Gyeongbokgung Palace in Seoul at the start of the Chuseok holiday.⁣

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#PWRUP THE WORLD

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On New York’s Long Island, Sag Harbor is a beachfront haven for Black families. ⁣ ⁣ From @tmagazine: While vacationing one summer in the late 1930s, Maude Terry came upon a 20-acre plot that faced a beach. The stretch of land was in Eastville — an area on the outskirts of Long Island's Sag Harbor that even in the 18th century had a reputation for welcoming Native Americans, manumitted Black people and European immigrants. The plot had been built on reclaimed marshland and thus unsuitable for growing vegetables, but Terry saw more in the land than its owner at the time did, envisioning a place where Black families could rest, raise families and simply exist without the burden of systemic oppression.⁣ ⁣ Terry and her sister Amaza Lee Meredith brokered a deal promising to find buyers for 70 parcels of land in the area, most of which were 50 by 100 to 125 feet, and began recruiting Black families and friends to move in. In doing so, they created not only the oldest historically Black subdivision in Sag Harbor but one of the most enduring Black beachfront communities in America, which, despite the threat of developers, has now spanned multiple generations. This was a place that allowed its residents to transcend the economic stratification that still exists between Black and white Americans, and to convene and find pleasure in a time when survival was the priority and joy was an afterthought. The sisters named the community Azurest: a "heavenly peace, blue rest, blue haven," as Meredith wrote for her sister's eulogy. ⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read @s_evangelina’s full story for @tmagazine. Photos by @whoisdamaster.⁣ ⁣ Pictured: The artist Frank Wimberley and his wife, Juanita, in their mid-1960s Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired home in Sag Harbor Hills; Brooke Williams and her daughter, Ada, in Sag Harbor; the artist Michael A. Butler surrounded by books and historical documents pertaining to the Eastville community. ⁣

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President Trump left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and returned to the White House on Monday evening after spending 3 nights at the center. After landing on the South Lawn, Trump ascended stairs to a rarely used White House balcony above the Diplomatic Entrance, into which he typically walks. Trump then turned to face his helicopter — and the live television cameras — and removed his mask before giving the departing Marine One a long salute. At a news conference on Monday afternoon, Trump’s physician, Dr. Sean P. Conley, said that the president had “met or exceeded all standard hospital discharge criteria,” but that he was not “out of the woods yet” in his fight against Covid-19. “We’re looking to this weekend,” Dr. Conley said. “If we can get through to Monday, with him remaining the same or improving better yet, then we will all take that final deep sigh of relief.” The president’s doctors also said that he had received a third dose of the antiviral drug remdesivir, and that he had continued to take dexamethasone, a steroid drug that has been shown to be beneficial to patients who are very sick with Covid-19. Dr. Conley did not give a firm answer about whether Trump would be confined to his residence. The West Wing is experiencing a growing outbreak, with Trump’s press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, joining the list on Monday of his close aides who have tested positive for the virus. The doctors’ remarks came after Trump tweeted that he would be returning to the White House, which has its own medical suite. In doing so, as he has throughout the pandemic, he downplayed the seriousness of a virus that has killed more than 209,000 people in the United States, writing in his post: “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life.” Tap the link in our bio for the latest updates about the president’s condition. Photo by @anna.money

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Original Realizado con una cámara Canon Power Shoot Pro 70

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15 hours of audio recording from the grand jury inquiry into the killing of Breonna Taylor was made public on Friday. The recording was filed in court by the Kentucky attorney general, Daniel Cameron. The move came after a grand juror filed a court motion asking for the proceedings to be made public and accusing Cameron of using the jurors to deflect blame over the decision. The rare release of audio from the grand jury proceedings — an inquiry that would usually remain secret — may shed light on the jurors’ decision to indict 1 of 3 Louisville police officers who fired their weapons. According to the recording, grand jurors heard at least 2 Louisville police officers who were at the raid on Taylor’s apartment say the group knocked and announced their presence several times before breaking down the door. Those accounts have been questioned by several of Taylor’s neighbors and her boyfriend. Detective Myles Cosgrove, one of the 2 officers who shot Taylor, said that a neighbor came outside and got into an argument with Brett Hankison, a former officer who fired his weapon during the raid and whom the grand jury indicted for endangering Taylor’s neighbors. The unidentified neighbor yelled at them, “something about leave her alone, there was some girl there,” Detective Cosgrove said in an interview with police investigators last month that was played for the grand jury. He said officers were outside knocking for 90 seconds, and that the volume escalated from “gentle knocking” to “forceful pounding” to pounding while yelling “police.” Another officer at the raid, Detective Michael Nobles, told police investigators he heard movement and voices, including a female voice, inside the apartment before officers entered. In previous interviews with The Times, 11 of 12 of Taylor’s neighbors said they never heard the police identify themselves. One neighbor said he heard the group say “police,” just once. The jurors indicted Hankison last week, but their decision to not charge either of the officers who shot her was met with angry protests in Louisville, during which 1 man shot 2 police officers. Tap the link in our bio for the latest updates. Photo by @xburrell41

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Yo, Nluz Love, fotografiado por Tracy England

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President Trump and the first lady have contracted the coronavirus. Here’s what we know now: The president, who said early Friday morning that he had tested positive for the virus, has had what one person described as cold-like symptoms. At a fund-raiser he attended at his golf club at Bedminster, New Jersey, on Thursday, where one attendee said the president came in contact with about 100 people, he seemed lethargic. A person briefed on the matter said that Trump fell asleep on Air Force One on the way back from a rally in Minnesota on Wednesday night. The president’s announcement upended the race in an instant, with less than 5 weeks to go before the election. Joe Biden is expected to be tested today. Vice President Mike Pence, and his wife, Karen, tested negative for the virus on Friday. Mr. Trump’s disclosure that he had been infected by the virus sent a shudder around the world on Friday, shaking global markets and drawing sympathy from leaders who have grappled with the pandemic in their own countries. President Vladimir Putin of Russia sent Mr. Trump a telegram wishing him and his wife, Melania, “a speedy recovery and expressing sincere support at this difficult moment,” the Kremlin said. Update: Joe Biden has tested negative for the coronavirus, his campaign announced Friday. Tap the link in our bio to read more of the latest about President Trump and what impact the news will have on the election and campaign. Photo by @tom_brenner

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Libro de artistas latinoamericanos en el que estoy presente creado para mostrarlo en bibliotecas de USA de forma gratuita para niños con pocos recursos económicos.

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Travelers came from across the world to ski in the most idyllic resorts of the Austrian alps. Many of them went home with the coronavirus. People knew in late February and early March that the coronavirus was spreading in nearby northern Italy, and across the other border in Germany. But no one was alarmed. Austrian officials downplayed concerns as tourists crowded into cable cars by day, and après-ski bars at night. Then they all went home, unwittingly taking the virus with them. Infected in Ischgl (pictured) or in surrounding villages, thousands of skiers carried the coronavirus to more than 40 countries on 5 continents. Many of Iceland’s first known cases were traced to Ischgl. In March, nearly half the cases in Norway were linked to Austrian ski holidays. 9 months into an outbreak that has killed a million people worldwide, Ischgl is where the era of global tourism, made possible by cheap airfares and open borders, collided with a pandemic. For decades, as trade and travel drew the world closer, public health policy, enshrined by treaty, encouraged global mass tourism by calling for open borders, even during outbreaks. But what is now clear is that the policy was about politics and economics more than public health, experts say. At least 1,000 people from dozens of countries intend to sue the Austrian government. A lawyer in Vienna recently filed the first test suits on behalf of 4 visitors, 2 of whom have since died of Covid-19. The lawsuit says the government should have closed the resort earlier and told tourists to stay away. Tap the link in our bio to read more about how the coronavirus has affected tourists and the community of Ischgl. Photo by @andreamantovaniphotography.

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Última página de mi PDF De la línea al paisaje de la Arquitectura. Nombre propuesto por el psiquiatra Ignacio Mearín. Fotografía realizada en el año 1998.

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Rio de Janeiro’s annual carnival parade has been canceled. ⁣ ⁣ Even during the 1918 flu pandemic and both World Wars, Rio’s famous carnival went on with the show. But the coronavirus has forced an indefinite suspension of the parade, leaving the city reeling.⁣ ⁣ Faced with a pandemic that has killed more than 142,000 people — a toll second only to the United States — a deep economic crisis, and a president whose inner circle is engulfed in a growing number of criminal and legislative investigations, Rio residents are being deprived of the moment of catharsis many look forward to year-round.⁣ ⁣ The organizers of the parade decided, for the first time since 1932, when Rio’s samba parade became official, to suspend it, depriving the city of an important source of revenue and its citizens of performances that often deliver skewering political commentary.⁣ ⁣ The heads of the city’s leading samba organizations found that without a vaccine, conditions would not be safe.⁣ ⁣ “I want this moment to come, this moment when we will celebrate life that defeats death, when we will reunite, gather,” said Leandro Vieira, the artistic director of @mangueira_oficial, one of Rio’s most traditional samba groups. “But this moment is not possible yet.”⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read the latest from Rio on the plans for carnival in 2021. Photos by @dadogaldierihilaea⁣

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In the 6 months since Covid-19 brought the nation to a standstill, the opioid epidemic has taken a sharp turn for the worse. More than 40 states have recorded increases in opioid-related deaths since the pandemic began, according to the @amermedicalassn. In Arkansas, the use of Narcan, an overdose-reversing drug, has tripled. Jacksonville, Florida, has seen a 40% increase in overdose-related calls. And in March alone, York County in Pennsylvania recorded 3 times the normal number of overdose deaths. In Vermont, opioid addiction has been a scourge for more than 2 decades. Last year, after aggressive efforts to expand access to treatment, Vermont saw its first decrease in opioid-related deaths since 2014. (That year, then-Gov. Peter Shumlin devoted his entire State of the State Message to what he called “a full-blown heroin crisis” gripping Vermont.) But Vermont saw 82 opioid overdoses through July of this year, up from 60 during the same period last year. One of those was Jefrey Cameron (2nd photo), 29, who died of an overdose in June. When Vermont shut down in March, so did Cameron’s job at a local pizza shop in Barre, Vermont, which provided his biggest support network. For Cameron, the shutdown of daily life in the spring not only led him back to drugs, but to using alone — an especially dangerous proposition. “He was home alone a lot more,” said his mother, Tara Reil. “And I think the drug became his friend.” Tap the link in our bio to read more about the nationwide increase of drug overdoses. Photos by @hlswift

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SHOT IN THE DARK #PWRUP⚡

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Lightkey
Lightings

El profundo sentir de los corazones en charca II

Roberto Palomo Camacho es Nluz Love. Fototransformador.

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ARE YOU READY? #PWRUP ⚡

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Lucy in the sky with diamonds

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Amid the pandemic and in the run-up to the presidential election, much of the world is watching the United States with a mix of shock, chagrin and, most of all, bafflement. “I feel sorry for Americans,” said U Myint Oo, a member of Parliament in Myanmar. The same sentiment prevailed among some officials in Canada. “Personally, it’s like watching the decline of the Roman Empire,” said Mike Bradley, the mayor of Sarnia, an industrial city on the border with Michigan. How did a superpower allow itself to be felled by a virus? And, after nearly 4 years during which President Trump has praised authoritarian leaders and dismissed some other countries as insignificant and crime-ridden, is the U.S. in danger of exhibiting some of the same traits he has disparaged? Adding to the bewilderment, Trump has dodged questions about whether he will commit to a peaceful transition of power should he lose the November election. In Belarus, where tens of thousands of people have faced down the police after the widely disputed re-election last month of President Aleksandr G. Lukashenko, Trump’s remarks sounded familiar. “It reminds me of Belarus, when a person cannot admit defeat and looks for any means to prove that he couldn’t lose,” said Kiryl Kalbasnikau, a 29-year-old opposition activist and actor. “This would be a warning sign for any democracy.” Tap the link in our bio to read more about how the U.S. is viewed abroad.

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Light Key

Reflejos de tiempo